“I felt the drums rolling on my stomach”: the Folle Journee de Nantes vibrates for the hearing impaired

“I felt the drums rolling on my stomach”: the Folle Journee de Nantes vibrates for the hearing impaired


Bringing classical music to as many people as possible has been the credo of the Folle Journe de Nantes for thirty years. Among the 297 concerts of this edition which closes its doors this Sunday February 4, some are accessible to the hearing impaired. La Folle Journee makes available Subpacs, vibrating vests to allow them to feel the music.

These vests, originally created for gamers and video game fans, are now used at music festivals. “They allow immersion in sound, a feeling that goes with the visual dimension of the show,” says Anne Chevalme, project coordinator and sign language mediator at 1.2.3 Cité Cap which supports cultural structures in making events accessible. “The vests are connected to the sound console, it is this which sends the impulses,” she explains.

Difficult access to culture

This Thursday, February 1, Patrick Lelong, 70 years old, came specifically from Sables-d’Olonne (Vendée). “I want to try this vest,” assures one who has suffered a hearing loss of almost 80%. Despite his equipment, in the cinema, in the theater, he has difficulty perceiving everything. “We should tell the sound engineers to stop putting in background sounds, we can’t hear,” he complains. Mariejo, his wife, is also equipped to listen to a concert of Eitetsu Fu-Un no Kai, a spectacular ensemble of taikos and Japanese percussion.

“I think it’s great to allow us to share this moment,” she says, as the drums resonate. After an hour, Patrick shows a big smile. “It’s worth the trip,” he swears. “We feel like heart palpitations, vibrations that move,” smiles Mariejo, at the end of the concert. I felt the drums rolling across my stomach. »



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